Soil Fertility

The Green Grass of Spring

Disclaimer:
The views and opinions expressed on this blog are those of the authors and are not necessarily those of RDUSA.  RDUSA accepts no responsibility or liability for views, ideas, or opinions expressed on this blog.
The Green Grass of Spring
The Green Grass of Spring
How if Affects Calf Growth and Cow Breedback
What a joyful moment it is […]

Pasture Walk with Green Heron Growers and Organic Grass Dairy

We are pleased to announce a pasture walk on the properties of John Brickers’ Organic Grass Dairy and Steve Rockcastle’s Green Heron Growers on August 3rd, 2016 in Sherman, New York. This will be held from 8:30 am to 4:00 pm and will include a meal, which will feature 100% grass fed beef burgers, […]

May 25th, 2016|Association News, Devons, News, Soil Fertility|1 Comment

The Role of Ruminants in Solving Ecological Problems

The Article
Jeremy Engh has sent a link to an article titled “The Role of Ruminants in Reducing Agriculture’s Carbon Footprint in North America”.  This article is found on the Journal of Soil and Water Conservation website and is copyrighted by the Soil and Water Conservation Society.  It is authored by W. R. Teaque of Texas […]

Info on Fall Conference, Show and Sale

It’s only Seven Months Away!

Yes, the 2016 Fall Conference, National Show and Sale is only 7 months away and the planning is almost complete.  So let’s see what’s going to happen!
The Dates
The dates for the activities are September 8-10.  Yes this year will have a 3 day format.
The Location
The location is going to be in […]

Considering Compost Tea

Dr. Ingham gives us the dirt about making your very own compost tea elixir.

May 16th, 2013|Compost, Linked, Soil Fertility|0 Comments

Dr. Olree Tells All: The Forbidden Knowledge Series

Forbidden Knowledge Presents, Dr Richard Olree of a speech held in Livonia MI about the benefits of minerals, and whole foods, In the genetic structure of life and the human body.
There are 5 videos in the series: click here for more

April 16th, 2013|Health, Minerals|0 Comments

Water isn’t the whole issue…

Dr. Albrecht gives us his take on why there is more to drought than just water: [The Drought Myth — An Absence of Water is Not the Problem](http://www.acresusa.com/toolbox/reprints/droughtmyth_nov00.pdf)

February 16th, 2013|Linked, Soil Fertility|0 Comments

SOIL not DIRT – Dr Elaine Ingham talks Soil Microbiology

Dr. Elaine Ingham talks about soil fertility and the role of soil microbial life.

May 16th, 2012|Compost, Linked, Soil Fertility|0 Comments

Herbs to Help Your Pasture

A well-managed pasture is an amazing ecosystem of nature. It may contain a variety of grasses, weeds or forbs, and other naturally occurring plants, some of which may be classified as herbs. When properly managed, diverse pasture can provide virtually all of the nutrition our grazing animals need to not only survive, but to thrive in the full bloom of health. Our own pastures had been acidic and full of weeds – a virtual monoculture of fescue and some bluegrass. After three years, we sowed orchard grass, crabgrass, annual and perennial rye, and white and red clovers for nitrogen. The combination of warm and cool season grasses, along with herbs, created a wonderfully diverse ecosystem.

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September 20th, 2010|Soil Fertility|1 Comment

Adventures in Nutrient Management

Bluebirds frolicked overhead on a bright and sunny December 2007 day scoping out possible nesting sites for 2008 before heading south. Whether it was global warming or not, it was a beautiful day last year to stick an auger in the ground and take soil samples of the entire farm. Being questioned by experts many times at the podium for not knowing my in-depth soil fertility, precipitated a move after 17 years, to get a soil analysis and have a nutrient management plan developed. This plan, cost shared by the Natural Resource Conservation Service (NRCS) will ultimately land me on the Environmental Working Group’s website after a 130 year farm history of not being in any government programs.

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September 20th, 2009|Husbandry, Soil Fertility|0 Comments